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Co-founders Viktorya Riley and Tatiana Podoliako call themselves ‘magic creators.’ That’s because their organic cotton candy tastes like what you imagine unicorns eat for breakfast rather than what you’re accustoming to snacking on at the circus. (Photo:Fluffness)

6 vendors you need to shop at Emporiyum

Looking for a delicious new obsession? The third annual Emporiyum takes place this weekend (November 12 and 13). The artfully curated food market features close to 100 participants spread out across Union Market’s Dock 5. There are well-known headliners galore – from Dolcezza and Chaia to Luke’s Lobster and Momofuku Milk Bar – and plenty of future stars.

Here are the six vendors you might not already know that you need to visit.

Picnic Gourmet Foods

Heather O’Donovan and Brady Marz are all about loving the spreads and spreading the love. The husband and wife team have developed a line of stellar spreads made with labneh, a thick and creamy Greek yogurt. The Bethesda-based business offers five flavors: a positively addictive Moroccan cilantro, punchy tandoori garlic, smoky chipotle sage, herbed goat cheese, and parmesan. They work well as dips, slathered on sandwiches, or as boosters in sauces. Additionally, the company sells bet-you-can’t-eat-just-twelve brown butter cardamom cookies and slightly spicy, totally rich chipotle cheddar crackers.

Fluffness

Co-founders Viktorya Riley and Tatiana Podoliako call themselves ‘magic creators.’ That’s because their organic cotton candy tastes like what you imagine unicorns eat for breakfast rather than what you’re accustoming to snacking on at the circus. The D.C.-based duo offers 20 different flavors of spun sugar, including honey and rose, champagne, pumpkin, and s’mores, which is made by stuffing marshmallow cotton candy with shaved chocolate and graham cracker pieces.

Zesty Z

In Mediterranean households, a container of za’atar on the kitchen table is as common as a saltshaker in the States. It takes its name from the dried wild thyme, which provides the dominant flavor. It’s mixed with olive oil, sesame seeds, sumac, oregano, and a hint of salt. This version is the brainchild of co-founders Alexander Harik and his mother, Lorraine Harik, who created the recipe. The seasoning is perfect for salad dressings, sprinkled on eggs, or in marinades.

Sfoglini

To clear up any confusion, it’s pronounced sfo-lini (the ‘g’ is silent). The name is the Italian word for a professional pasta maker. The Brooklyn-based company produces a dozen different dry pastas, including lesser-known specialty noodles like trumpets, zucca (imagine little pumpkins with an opening at the back), and reginetti, which resemble miniature sheets of lasagna. A variety of shapes are produced in flavors that change with the season – from cold weather favorites, such as chestnut and porcini, to springtime standouts like nettles and ramps. You may have already tried Sfoglini’s products before – Rose’s Luxury is a client.

Molly & Me

Kay Holseberg harvests pecans, purchases further nuts, and roasts small batches in a cookhouse on her 150-acre farm outside Charleston, North Carolina. There are half a dozen choices, including those flavored with pecan-infused bourbon, cinnamon sugar, and praline. These are good on oatmeal, in muffins, or sprinkled on a sundae. The self-proclaimed ‘Sneaky Hot’ option adds a flash of fire to salads or a cup of yogurt.

Bacon Jams

Bacon makes everything better. This sweet, salty, swiney spread is the perfect pick-me-up for sandwiches, burgers or pasta. For a slightly spicier option, there’s a version with red chili and garlic. The black pepper iteration is nicer-than-nice on baked potatoes, mixed into baked beans, or spread on Eggs Benedict.

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